Community Impact

By LaToya Stevens is the Marketing and Communications Director at Heart of Missouri United Way

Juneteenth (June 19) is the oldest nationally celebrated commemoration of the ending of slavery in the United States. Today, Juneteenth commemorates African American freedom, and emphasizes education and achievement.

It’s celebrated across America with block parties, cookouts and educational events. You may not know the history of Juneteenth because until today, it has not been recognized as a federal holiday. If it’s not part of your culture, this may be your first time hearing about Juneteenth.

By Dr. Juliette Tuakli, Founder and Medical Director of CHILDAccra

Good start, right direction, but more to do.

That’s how United Way leaders see the job ahead when it comes to recovery and rebuilding in the wake of COVID-19.

While the world’s largest privately-funded nonprofit raised an unprecedented amount of money last year for COVID-19 relief, the pandemic’s multiple waves around the world remind us that our work is far from over.

By Trista Stout-Walker, Vice President of Community Impact

I recently had the pleasure of traveling with my family out West for a wedding. Growing up, I would shutter to admit that I was from Alabama, especially rural Alabama.  My fear would focus on how I was perceived or society’s perception of how we talk or live. My recent travels showed me that Alabamians are very proud. We wear our RTR hats or War Eagle t-shirts proudly. All you have to do is say “Roll Tide” in a crowd and immediately find a new friend. We visited three different states and I encountered numerous residents of Alabama. In Gardiner, Montana, the Iron Horse Bar & Grill is owned and operated from a native of Tuscaloosa. It was decked out with Alabama memorabilia and even had a license plate from Washington County.

By Trista Stout-Walker, Vice President of Community Impact

In recognition of Mental Health Awareness month, I reflect on the past year and the resiliency shown by the Partner Agencies of United Way. Our community suffered tremendous anguish, anxiety, and grief during the pandemic and other events that transpired in 2020. The past year highlighted the need in human and health support services for increased mental health supports.

Do you know someone with a HEART OF GOLD?

Has someone you know gone above and beyond the call of duty?

Do you know someone on the front lines during this unique time that has impacted you or an agency in our community?  

UWSWA is proud to honor its volunteers with the Heart of Gold Award. The awards recognize volunteers for their dedication and service in the areas of education, health, financial stability, or essentials. The engagement of the hundreds of individuals who volunteer with us each year is critical to the success of both UWSWA and our 46 partner agencies.

Do you know someone with a HEART OF GOLD?

Has someone you know gone above and beyond the call of duty?

Do you know someone on the front lines during this unique time that has impacted you or an agency in Choctaw, Clarke, or Washington Counties?  

In 2021, UWSWA is proud to honor its volunteers with the Heart of Gold Award, which recognizes up to four volunteers in Choctaw, Clarke, and Washington Counties — for their dedication and service in the areas of education, health, financial stability, or essentials. The engagement of the hundreds of individuals who volunteer with us each year is critical to the success of both UWSWA and our 46 partner agencies.

By Brad Martin, Volunteer Income Tax Assistance Program Coordinator

United Way of Southwest Alabama (UWSWA) is one of several Mobile area nonprofit organizations that partners with the IRS to offer the Volunteer Income Tax Assistance (VITA) program. Indeed, UWSWA partner agencies Goodwill Gulf Coast and Mobile Community Action also participate in helping low and middle income taxpayers file their tax returns for free with the help of certified volunteers. And many other organizations join us in this work.

The United Way of Southwest Alabama mourns with the Asian American and Pacific Islander community—including those in our United Way family—after the murder of eight people, including six women of Asian descent, in Georgia. It’s important that we say their names: Delaina Ashley Yaun, Daoyou Feng, Xiaojie Tan, Paul Andre Michels, Soon Chung Park, Suncha Kim, Yong Ae Yue, and Hyun Jung Grant.

United Way of Southwest Alabama distributes 238,500 masks to Mobile County Public Schools students, employees

United Way of Southwest Alabama (UWSWA) is making sure every Mobile County Public Schools student in grades four and above as well as every teacher and staff member receives reusable cloth facemasks to protect them against COVID-19.

By Trista Stout-Walker, UWSWA Vice President of Community Impact

Society leads us to believe that we need the newest and best technology, cars, homes, clothing, etc. To many in Southwest Alabama this is not a reality. Individuals and families are living paycheck to paycheck, just to cover life’s basic needs. At times, this may not be a living wage. United Way of Southwest Alabama (UWSWA), our 46 partners, and community coalitions are here to help. We collectively align to form the community’s safety net. 

UNITED WAY OF SOUTHWEST ALABAMA'S RESPONSE TO COVID-19 TO

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