Community Impact

On Thursday, September 23 and Friday, September 24, Mobile County Volunteer Organizations Active in Disasters (VOAD) and the United Way of Southwest Alabama (UWSWA) will host a Hurricane Ida Resource Fair at Central Presbyterian Church (1260 Dauphin Street, 36604) from 7am until 11 am. Several area nonprofits and government agencies will be on site to provide storm-related assistance to Hurricane Ida survivors and evacuees. Evacuees will also have the opportunity to speak to representatives regarding legal services, school registration, medical services, and many other important necessities.

By Trista Stout-Walker, Vice President of Community Impact

Your donations directly affect United Way of Southwest Alabama’s (UWSWA) investment in Southwest Alabama. UWSWA takes the generous supports from community members, businesses, and local foundations and converts funding into service opportunities. Opportunities like supporting a women experiencing homelessness a safe space at a local motel and food delivery until shelter is available at McKemie Place. Opportunities like a family having a location close to home that offers the Summer Feeding Program. Opportunities like mental health counseling available during school hours to assist children dealing with stress, anxiety, or trauma. Opportunities like 2,949 tax returns completed by the SAFE Coalition at no charge to the tax client. The list for opportunities provided by UWSWA and our partners can go on and on.

By Trista Stout-Walker, Vice President of Community Impact

Have you ever returned home from the grocery store and realized you forgot an important item or ingredient? It can be the most frustrating thing at times. Especially, when we spend time preparing for the trip, traveling to the store, shopping for goods, and returning home. For some in our catchment area that requires hours, substantial money, and resources. This is because they live in a “food desert”. According to Wikipedia, a food desert is an area that has limited access to affordable and nutritious food, in contrast with an area with higher access to supermarkets with fresh foods, which is called a food oasis.

By LaToya Stevens is the Marketing and Communications Director at Heart of Missouri United Way

Juneteenth (June 19) is the oldest nationally celebrated commemoration of the ending of slavery in the United States. Today, Juneteenth commemorates African American freedom, and emphasizes education and achievement.

It’s celebrated across America with block parties, cookouts and educational events. You may not know the history of Juneteenth because until today, it has not been recognized as a federal holiday. If it’s not part of your culture, this may be your first time hearing about Juneteenth.

By Dr. Juliette Tuakli, Founder and Medical Director of CHILDAccra

Good start, right direction, but more to do.

That’s how United Way leaders see the job ahead when it comes to recovery and rebuilding in the wake of COVID-19.

While the world’s largest privately-funded nonprofit raised an unprecedented amount of money last year for COVID-19 relief, the pandemic’s multiple waves around the world remind us that our work is far from over.

By Trista Stout-Walker, Vice President of Community Impact

I recently had the pleasure of traveling with my family out West for a wedding. Growing up, I would shudder to admit that I was from Alabama, especially rural Alabama.  My fear would focus on how I was perceived or society’s perception of how we talk or live. My recent travels showed me that Alabamians are very proud. We wear our RTR hats or War Eagle t-shirts proudly. All you have to do is say “Roll Tide” in a crowd and immediately find a new friend. We visited three different states and I encountered numerous residents of Alabama. In Gardiner, Montana, the Iron Horse Bar & Grill is owned and operated from a native of Tuscaloosa. It was decked out with Alabama memorabilia and even had a license plate from Washington County.

By Trista Stout-Walker, Vice President of Community Impact

In recognition of Mental Health Awareness month, I reflect on the past year and the resiliency shown by the Partner Agencies of United Way. Our community suffered tremendous anguish, anxiety, and grief during the pandemic and other events that transpired in 2020. The past year highlighted the need in human and health support services for increased mental health supports.

Do you know someone with a HEART OF GOLD?

Has someone you know gone above and beyond the call of duty?

Do you know someone on the front lines during this unique time that has impacted you or an agency in our community?  

UWSWA is proud to honor its volunteers with the Heart of Gold Award. The awards recognize volunteers for their dedication and service in the areas of education, health, financial stability, or essentials. The engagement of the hundreds of individuals who volunteer with us each year is critical to the success of both UWSWA and our 46 partner agencies.

Do you know someone with a HEART OF GOLD?

Has someone you know gone above and beyond the call of duty?

Do you know someone on the front lines during this unique time that has impacted you or an agency in Choctaw, Clarke, or Washington Counties?  

In 2021, UWSWA is proud to honor its volunteers with the Heart of Gold Award, which recognizes up to four volunteers in Choctaw, Clarke, and Washington Counties — for their dedication and service in the areas of education, health, financial stability, or essentials. The engagement of the hundreds of individuals who volunteer with us each year is critical to the success of both UWSWA and our 46 partner agencies.

HURRICANE IDA INFORMATION

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